Pew Research on Hispanic Politics

Hispanic Trends
  1. Latinos’ Changing Views of Same-Sex Marriage

  2. Views of Obama Improve among Hispanics

  3. When Labels Don’t Fit: Hispanics and Their Views of Identity

    A majority of Hispanics say they most often identify themselves by their family’s country of origin; just 24% say they prefer a pan-ethnic label.
  4. As Deportations Rise to Record Levels, Most Latinos Oppose Obama’s Policy

    By a ratio of more than two-to-one (59% versus 27%), Latinos disapprove of the way the Obama administration is handling deportations of unauthorized immigrants.
  5. Illegal Immigration Backlash Worries, Divides Latinos

    The national political backlash against illegal immigration has created new divisions among Latinos and heightened their concerns about discrimination against members of their ethnic group-including those who were born in the United States or who immigrated legally.
  6. Latinos and the 2010 Elections: Strong Support for Democrats; Weak Voter Motivation

    In a year when support for Democratic candidates has eroded, the party’s standing among one key voting group—Latinos—appears as strong as ever.
  7. Hispanics and the New Administration

    A year and a half after a lengthy, often rancorous debate over immigration reform filled the chambers of a stalemated Congress, the issue appears to have receded in importance among one of the groups most affected by it--Latinos.
  8. The Hispanic Vote in the 2008 Election

    Hispanics voted for Democrats Barack Obama and Joe Biden over Republicans John McCain and Sarah Palin by a margin of more than two-to-one in the 2008 presidential election, 67% versus 31%.
  9. Hispanics See Their Situation in U.S. Deteriorating; Oppose Key Immigration Enforcement Measures

    Half (50%) of all Latinos say that the situation of Latinos in this country is worse now than it was a year ago.
  10. 2008 National Survey of Latinos: Hispanic Voter Attitudes

    Hispanic registered voters support Democrat Barack Obama for president over Republican John McCain by 66% to 23%, according to a nationwide survey of 2,015 Latinos.

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Note...

How come some of the people shown on the left don't look Hispanic?

Hispanic or Latino is not a race.   There are Latinos of many different races and physical characteristics.  For more information see our FAQ article, Why doesn't the census include Hispanic as a race?, and the Latino Blog post Let's Stop Segmenting People by Race! 

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