Pew Research on Hispanic Economics

Hispanic Trends
  1. Latinos Increasingly Confident in Personal Finances, See Better Economic Times Ahead

    Hispanics have become more upbeat about their personal finances and their financial future since the Great Recession, with 81% saying that they expect their family's financial situation to improve in the next year.
  2. Latino Jobs Growth Driven by U.S. Born

    For the first time in nearly two decades, immigrants do not account for the majority of Hispanic workers in the United States. And most of the job gains made by Hispanics during the economic recovery have gone to U.S.-born workers.
  3. Latinos Express Growing Confidence In Personal Finances, Nation’s Direction

    I.  Overview Hispanics have grown more satisfied with the nation’s direction and more confident in their finances since 2011, according to a new survey from the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center. Today, half of Latinos (51%) express satisfaction with the direction of the country, a 13 percentage point increase over […]
  4. Characteristics of the 60 Largest Metropolitan Areas by Hispanic Population

    Nearly half (45%) of the nation’s Hispanic population lives in just 10 metropolitan areas and over 75% live in 60 of the largest Hispanic metropolitan areas, according to an analysis of Census Bureau data by the Pew Hispanic Center.
  5. The 10 Largest Hispanic Origin Groups: Characteristics, Rankings, Top Counties

    Among the 50.7 million Hispanics in the United States, nearly two-thirds (65%), or 33 million, self-identify as being of Mexican origin, according to tabulations of the 2010 American Community Survey.
  6. Hispanics Say They Have the Worst of a Bad Economy

    A majority of Latinos believe that the economic downturn that began in 2007 has been harder on them than on any other ethnic group in America.
  7. Hispanic Poverty Rate Highest In New Supplemental Census Measure

    The poverty rate for Hispanics was 28.2% in 2010, higher than it was for blacks, non-Hispanic whites or Asians, and higher than the official poverty rate for Hispanics, 26.7%, reported by the Census Bureau.
  8. Childhood Poverty Among Hispanics Sets Record, Leads Nation

    The spread of poverty across the United States that began at the onset of the Great Recession of 2007-2009 and accelerated last year hit one fast-growing demographic group especially hard: Latino children.
  9. Hispanic Household Wealth Fell by 66% from 2005 to 2009

    Median household wealth among Hispanics fell from $18,359 in 2005 to $6,235 in 2009—a 66% decline. This was larger than the decrease for black households (53%) and white households (16%), according to an analysis of newly-available Census Bureau data by the Pew Research Center's Social & Demographic Trends project.
  10. After the Great Recession: Foreign Born Gain Jobs; Native Born Lose Jobs

    In the year following the end of the Great Recession in June 2009, foreign-born workers gained 656,000 jobs while native-born workers lost 1.2 million. As a result, the unemployment rate fell for immigrants while it rose for the native born.

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How come some of the people shown on the left don't look Hispanic?

Hispanic or Latino is not a race.   There are Latinos of many different races and physical characteristics.  For more information see our FAQ article, Why doesn't the census include Hispanic as a race?, and the Latino Blog post Let's Stop Segmenting People by Race! 

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